Science is Coming

8996 kilometers across a continent and ocean. 18 hours of sunshine per day. 10 weeks. One Mars simulation chamber.

Yep, I’m back in Copenhagen. I’m working on a project with the Mars group at the Niels Bohr Institute, using a Mars simulation chamber to examine the big question: Why is the red planet red? Or, more accurately, how is the red planet red? I’ll be determining whether UV radiation can induce the oxidation of magnetite to hematite, the mineral responsible for Mars’ distinctive shade. I’m very thankful to be funded by the Monticello Foundation at Caltech.

This is my nifty version of Mars in a box.

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Because I’m passionate about reaching a broad audience with my scientific endeavours, I’m starting this blog to document my science shenanigans, from mineralogy in the Mars chamber to my caffeinated attempts at learning Python. Science should be for everyone, so every week I’ll be updating you, and your grandma, and your dog, about what I’m currently working on.

But I’m no world-class researcher (yet). I just finished my third year of undergrad at Caltech, double-majoring in Planetary Science and Philosophy (you might think this is an odd combo — I’ll blog about it soon). I like philosophizing about alien life, experimenting with different genres of journalism, and hunting for the best cappuccinos in Denmark. As an exchange student in Copenhagen last fall, I fell in love with the city and decided to come back for this summer project.

As I’m trying my hand at this science communication thing, there will probably be some typos and inaccuracies throughout — remember, this is my journey through the dark forests of literature searches and experimental trial and error. Science communication is a two-way street, so interaction with you all is important — if you read something that makes no sense or is just plain wrong, write me a comment!

Brace yourselves — science is coming.

2 thoughts on “Science is Coming

  1. So incredibly happy to see you loving science all these years later! I love your research question. Nielsen Both would be proud.

  2. Science and Philosophy is a cool combo! There are a number of great scientists who are philosophers, e.g., Aristotle, Rene Descartes, etc. (Looking forward to your blog on this).

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